Essential Oils

Irada Essentials- Essential Oils

Essential Oils are used in combination with carrier oils to carry the essential oil onto the skin. Essential oils are extracted from plants and is heavily used during aromtherapy sessions. It has medicinal benefits.

  • Lavender         
  • Eucalyptus
  • Tee Tree         
  • Lemongrass
  • Rosemary         
  • Sandalwood
  • Peppermint

Essential Oil Safety

Carrier oils allow essential oils to become safe for your skin when properly diluted. It's important to understand that essential oils are very volatile when used by themselves.

Medicinal Benefits

It's been said that essential oils can have medical benefits that address areas of stress, anxiety, headaches, migraines, etc. Please consult with your physician.

Aromatherapy

As the properties of essential oils are responsibly inhaled, they can be used as a way to reduce stress, pain, and even anxiety through the use of aromatherapy.

Lavender

Also known as ‘True Lavender’, Lavender (French) is grown in sunny hillsides of France. This region produces a Lavender Oil with a strong sweet, floral, and camphoraceous scent. Its high content of Linalyl acetate makes it ideal for soothing skin and for creating a sense of harmony of body and mind.

Lavender (40/42)

Our Lavender (40/42) is comprised of 100% natural constituents and has the ideal percentage of Linalool and Linalyl acetate esters which provides consistent floral notes. Due to its standardization and its ability to provide consistent scent it is ideally used in the manufacturing of soaps, candles, perfumes and cosmetics.

Eucalyptus (Blue Mallee)

The Blue Mallee, or Blue-Leaved Mallee, is a deeply rooted perennial tree in the Mallee regions of Victoria and NSW. The bark is smooth and fibrous near the trunk base. Leaves are disjunct and linear to narrow-lanceolate.

Juvenile leaves are glaucous and adult leaves gray-green. Eucalyptus leaves are the favourite food of Koalas, and have been used as traditional medicine by the aboriginal peoples of Australia. Having the highest cineol and eucalyptol among the Eucalyptus, it continues to be used as a highly popular Essential Oil throughout the world today.

Tea Tree

The Tea Tree is a small tree or shrub with needle-like leaves. It is also domestically referred to as Ti-Tree. It can grow up to 7 meters (20 feet) in height and thrives in marshy areas, though it is now cultivated in plantations. The aboriginal people of Australia have long used Tea tree Oil. 

Historically, the leaves were used as a substitute for tea, which is how it got its name. In World War II, the producers and the cutters of Tea Tree were exempt from military service until enough essential oil had been accumulated to accommodate the military’s needs. 

Tea Tree is very robust and is ready for cutting only two years after its previous harvest. As Essential Oils have become more accepted by the public, the use of Tea Tree Oil has increased significantly. This is readily seen in the commercial products now using Tea Tree, although this grade is best used for therapeutic applications. This is one of the very few Essential Oils that can be applied to the skin ‘neat’, or without dilution, at a maximum rate of 3 drops.

Rosemary

Rosemary has an extensive history of being used medicinally for several thousand years, and its leaves were traditionally burned to purify the air. It was also used in Roman burial rites, and that practice continued well into the Middle Ages when it was customary to lay branches of Rosemary on the coffin at funerals. 

At present, Rosemary Oil is extensively used in aromatherapy applications and is a popular ingredient within the cosmetics industry, featured in perfumes, candles, soaps, shampoos, and more.

rosemary

Lemongrass

Lemongrass Essential Oil is known for its invigorating and cleansing properties. It can be used in facial toners as its astringent properties may assist in reducing the look of oily or greasy skin.

With its uplifting aroma, Lemongrass Essential Oil strengthens the senses and can be used in bath for soothing purposes. Lemongrass shares similar properties with citronella.

Sandalwood

Some thirty species of sandalwood occur throughout Asia, Australia and the Pacific region. The evergreen is parasitic, burrowing its roots into nearby trees to gain sustenance for the first seven years, leaving the other to die. It can grow up to 9 meters (30 feet) high and has a brown-gray trunk, many smooth slender branches, leathery leaves and small pink-purple flowers. It can take thirty to sixty years for a tree to reach full maturity at which time it can be harvested and the oil distilled. The documented use of Sandalwood goes back 4000 years to India, Egypt, Greece and Rome when many temples and structures were built with it. This practice has steadily decreased to the point where Sandalwood is now only used for its oil because of over-harvesting. As with all of our oils, which we acquire ethically, this is obtained from the Mysore Region through state-sponsored auctions in India. Mysore Sandalwood has extensive uses in the perfume industry as a fixative and fragrance, and in body-care products.

peppermint-essential-oil

Peppermint

Some thirty species of sandalwood occur throughout Asia, Australia and the Pacific region. The evergreen is parasitic, burrowing its roots into nearby trees to gain sustenance for the first seven years, leaving the other to die. It can grow up to 9 meters (30 feet) high and has a brown-gray trunk, many smooth slender branches, leathery leaves and small pink-purple flowers. It can take thirty to sixty years for a tree to reach full maturity at which time it can be harvested and the oil distilled. The documented use of Sandalwood goes back 4000 years to India, Egypt, Greece and Rome when many temples and structures were built with it. This practice has steadily decreased to the point where Sandalwood is now only used for its oil because of over-harvesting. As with all of our oils, which we acquire ethically, this is obtained from the Mysore Region through state-sponsored auctions in India. Mysore Sandalwood has extensive uses in the perfume industry as a fixative and fragrance, and in body-care products.

Frankincense

Frankincense originates from a small scraggly but hardy tree indigenous to the Middle East, which is small with abundant pinnacle leaves and white or pale pink flowers. The resin begins as a fragrant sticky milky-white liquid that flows from the trunk of the tree when cut. The dried tears are collected, and the resin is then distilled, producing the precious oil. The resin is known as olibanum, derived from the Arabic al-luban or ‘that which results from milking’, referring to the milky sap. It is used as incense, and has been traded for 5,000 years. Widely used in ancient Egypt, it was one of the ingredients used in the holy oil described in the Talmud. Frankincense was brought back to Europe by Frankish Crusaders (Frank-incense), and the oil is still highly prized today in the perfumery industry, and widely used in the manufacturing of skin-care products.

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